• Daily Life

    5 Things Tag

    Mother's Day Card

    Eva and Olivia did this tag recently, and I thought it would be fun to steal it.

    5 Things You’ll Find in My Purse

    I don’t think I have anything unusual in my purse, also, I have a smallish, crossbody since that seems to work best for my current situation, so not much will fit in, although I’ve managed to squeeze in a paperback before.

    1. Timecard for my temp job
    2. Various papers, cards, etc. related to my (will remain unnamed) side gig
    3. New sunglasses
    4. Pens
    5. Tiny notepad

    5 Things You’ll Find in My Bedroom

    1. A hoarder’s supply of yarn
    2. A hoarder’s supply of fabric
    3. A hoarder’s supply of toiletries
    4. Books including some of the 52 (the two interlibrary loans were allowed past the 50 limit) library books I have out. The rest are with me at my grandparents
    5. A budding collector’s supply of pens and markers (this is what happens when you watch bullet journal videos)

    5 Things I’ve Always Wanted to Do

    1. Make a full regency outfit for the Jane Austen festival (I’m hoping I will manage that for this year)
    2. Go to England and Ireland (at least, I theoretically want to travel, but I can’t seem to make myself drive out of my city, or even really into it)
    3. Be fit
    4. Sew a considerable portion of my wardrobe (part of the hang-up here relates to 3)
    5. Be proficient in a multitude of art mediums and handicrafts (I’m learning to streamline this)

    5 Things That Make Me Feel Happy

    1. Watching tv with my grandparents
    2. Holding my precious, baby niece
    3. Cuddling my sister’s precious mini cat (she looks like a kitten, courtesy of being a runt, but she’s grown)
    4. I have to steal Olivia’s because this is especially true for me this year, finishing a book and updating my Goodreads to reflect that. I then look at how I’m (currently) crushing my reading goals
    5. Similarly, using my mildliners to fill out the squares of my habit chart

    5 Things I’m Currently/Was Recently Into (I feel like I’m in between things)

    1. Mary Stewart romantic suspense novels. I know I’ve not ranked some of them high, but that is because I didn’t like the romance part of these particular ones. When thinking over this, I realized I kind of have three separate rating systems/points: morality, quality, and likeability. I usually focus on the first two and usually the first two are what affects my liking or finishing the book or not. But occasionally I find book that meet these standards but not the last.
    2. M.M. Kaye mysteries (she only wrote a few, and I think I’ve exhausted all of them except the one I skipped and one our library doesn’t have). I was reading these few with the Mary Stewart novels and kind of got them mixed up although they are different genres. They both often have such exotic (to me) settings (Cyprus, Crete, Corfu).
    3. Watching Monk with my grandparents. Well, I was until Sharona was replaced. Everything changed. I would’ve been okay if no one was substituted in or a totally different side character (this woman is a caricature of Sharona’s role), but now I’m done. I want to watch the later ones (that round up the show) when she returns.
    4. Taylor Swift songs again. I don’t know how to explain how little of a music person I am. Everyone seems to have Spotify or Pandora, but to me it’s huge that I installed Spotify on my phone. And I really don’t like much music, and what I do like I really have to in the mood for. Taylor Swift seems to have a song for everything or that fits any period of life? I was trying to figure out why I liked her stuff overall while with other pop singers I only like a song or two. I think it’s because the music is important, I mean the instrumentals. It’s not just a stripped background accompaniment. And her vocals go well with the music, they fit in but don’t drown (as opposed to the songs that ARE the vocals, I don’t like those). I think the lack of this is part of why I tend to prefer instrumentals (I love the Piano Guys versions of everything), soundtracks, and more tradition/folk music (and Peter Hollen’s covers!). I just think pop is not really good, and now I think I’ve indentified (for a non-musical person), why I really don’t care for it. I prefer not to HAVE to focus on the lyrics. Her lyrics are less inane too. They are also quite . . . psychologically interesting? I can’t agree with much of the overall tendency, but yet it’s all sort of hilarious?
    5. Backing up my TBR list. I can place any orders I want directly from the library lists, so I’ve tried to clear up any other collections of books. I’ve never found the Goodreads TBR list particularly useful for me. I use it occasionally, but I’m trying to immediately add any books I read about straight to my library lists, so I’ve cleared out most of my Goodreads list (a couple times over the years). I also had a bad habit of just bookmarking blog posts and such instead of directly adding them to shelves. I cleared out that folder. I previously had a list on Amazon for interlibrary loans but transferred that a while back to an Excel workbook. I then realized that if anything happened to the library site or if I moved, I’d lose years worth of TBR collecting. So, I’ve been backing that up on a separate sheet of the Excel workbook. I will have to put items on both the library lists and the Excel one from now on, but I think it is worth it. I just need to brush up my lists (make the formatting match, clear out any duplicates, etc.). I’ve included all reference books, cookbooks, etc. on the list as well, anything I want to look at. The total of the interlibrary loan possibilities plus the regular list currently stands at 1960. I know I do have a few duplicates to clear out. Possibly also books I’ve read and haven’t removed or kept on the list to reread (not usual). Bear in mind that TBR to me means that to-possibly-read. So TPR, I guess.

    5 Things on My To-Do List

    1. Find second job or a different one entirely
    2. Finish my second associate’s degree in about a year (possibly two)
    3. Get fit
    4. Complete my Regency/Federal outfit for Jane Austen festival
    5. Complete the art project I have in mind for a (very) late Mother’s Day present. In the interim I made her a smeared (as much as I’d love to blame being a leftie, I’m sure most of the blame is my impatience and carelessness) doodled calligraphy card. I used AmandaRachLee’s doodling tutorials for lavender and for butterflies (the tutorial starts at about 4:36).
  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Characters That Remind Me of Myself

    I’m picking characters with at least some similar personality characteristics , I’m not sure I think any or most of them are exactly like me. The first 5  are characters with similar personalities (i.e. rather brash/emotional/out of control types); generally speaking NOT the oldest sibling who seem to always be cast in the quiet, responsible cast, again, ouch. The other characters are those with traits I see in myself but who are not otherwise very similar.

    I’m wanting to do a post about how so often, I’m like the traditional portrayal of tomboys in personality, but not in outlook or tastes or goals or bravado/bravery. Many of the characters with my outlook, tastes, and goals are meek, sweet, or annoyingly poised. Then also, there are the uptight, old-maid characters whose opinions/outlook I can relate too. OW!

    1. Marianne Dashwood from Sense and Sensibility. I also get Marianne on these quizzes.
    2. Jo March from Little Women. The unbridled tongue and temper, um yes. The tomboyishness, no. (Rose in Rose in Bloom and Eight Cousins is a well-balanced character now that I’m thinking Alcott characters)
    3.  Skye from The Penderwicks series (the “Jo” of this loosely modern middle-grade version of Little Women). Again, the brashness.
    4. Laura of the Little House books. Just generally being the one who gets in trouble, particularly because of her words. Overall my childhood personality and proclivities were similar, outdoors and a bit rebellious but still not a tomboy.
    5. Oh, and this one is going to be good. Susan Pevensie. There have been a couple defenses of Susan Pevensie recently, more or less with the same criticisms of the book that I first saw years ago from a favorite author. However, I disagree with all of them, and Susan is definitely my least favorite of most of the children. And yet, a lot of what I see to dislike in Susan, I see in myself (bossiness mainly, for example). I think I’ll save more of my opinions for when I re-read Narnia, hopefully in the near future.
    6. Johnny Tremain, from Johnny Tremain. Quick spoken, quick tempered. Sense a pattern here?
    7. Catherine Morland from Northanger Abbey. No, overall I’m not like here, but I’ve frequently, particularly when I was younger, exhibited a great deal of her gullibility.
    8. Donna in a Tangled Web. Pretty sure that’s exactly how I would act in love (also, see below). Peter and Donna are absolutely the most ludicrous, hilarious over the top people. Of course, I can also see myself making a goose of myself like Jocelyn too though.
    9. Mara, in Mara, Daughter of the Nile. Now, this is going to sound vain, “Oh, yes, I’m exactly like a clever double spy!” No, what I mean is I’m rather (!!!) readable and manipulatable, like Mara is to Sheftu, he knows all along how much she is attracted to him and toys her with it. This aspect is similar to many of the older Heyer heroines.
    10. Every unimaginative character in L. M. Montgomery books. Yes, I’ve always been the literal person, however much I now want to be like Anne or Emily or Pat.
  • Handicrafts

    Yarn Along April 2019

    photo of book and knitting

    Knitting another baby blanket with KnitPicks Shine Worsted (of course), a variation on this well-loved pattern. I’m on the second book of All-of-A-Kind Family, although I’m obviously much above the intended age range (I don’t have much mental space at the moment, and I like to read books I feel I “missed out” on in my childhood), I’m enjoying them (also, five girls, one boy is a familiar situation!).

    I’m linking up here on Ginny Sheller’s blog

    and here for Crafting On.

  • Daily Life

    April 2019 Goals

    I didn’t  even write out my April goals until the end of the month. Basically, I’m working to get back on track.

    Since I’m reading tons (for me) I did up my reading goals

    • 10+ books, aim for 6 nonfiction, work on War and Peace in Serial Reader (I need to set aside time to do this once per week, the sticking point is that I need my notebook for notes and to keep track of characters and plot), work on Classics Club (I need to revisit this list and be a bit more conscious about this goal).
    • Pay off CC debt and lower CC limit (apparently that is the only way to curb my spending short of going debit-card only which seems rather archaic).
    • Work on exercise and diet plans (surely I can hit on SOMETHING I am willing to keep up with).
    • Get back on track with habits, goals, spending, etc.
    • 2+ knitting projects and block the last two (probably should make sure blocking is included in finishing, but overall, doing well on the knitting category).

    I forgot to include how my March habit chart looked.

    photo of habits chart

  • Daily Life

    2nd Quarter Goals

    Overall goal: Shake It Back Up! I’m slipping back into monotony and laziness and losing my drive, memory, and optimism. I marked some items with an “!” to help myself in this area. Obviously, this is edited a bit for privacy.

    Wellness and Habits

    • Lose 15 lbs, gain muscle, tone, and flexibility
    • Return to morning, lunch, and evening routine and identify sticking points to correct
    • Weekly reset (Saturday?), life admin, and monthly planning days
    • Set digital limits, have better options, use site blockers
    • Work on daily and weekly habits and aim for no school on weekend
    • Amp up meal prep, especially breakfast
    • Go outside more (work on strawberries for one thing) !

    Finances and Career

    • Figure out side gigs plus learn skills for more specialized gigs !
    • Pay off CC and personal loan
    • Live off last month’s income
    • Fund emergency fund to certain point, start fun savings and car savings
    • Plan career and internships
    • Make min amount per month
    • Purchase textbooks and set up school plan
    • Spanish, graphic design, future plans, re-evaluate habits

    Personal Development

    • Read 25 new-to-me books including several Classics Club and 12+ nonfiction books
    • Regency prep (outfit, tickets) and vacation prep
    • 6 major sewing projects and finish some partially complete ones
    • Work on room redesign
    • Weekly adventures !
    • Mother’s Day gift !
    • Reading journal, more in depth posts, etc. !
  • Culture and Entertainment

    What I Watched: March 2019

    I didn’t watch many movies this month, more television mysteries. We geniuses just realized (actually we had to be told), that since my dad has Amazon Prime (for how long I don’t know, probably years including ones when I paid for my own, ouch), we can watch his Prime video. Duh. I don’t love Prime, it’s not worth it to me to pay for it, but since now it’s free, I want to make more of an effort to find things to watch, so I’ve been going through my movie list. Of all the 153 movies I’ve currently checked, about 26 are on Netflix. I discovered Big Country (which I’d not heard of and which I greatly enjoyed) by searching Gregory Peck in the search bar, so I think I should try that option to find more movies/shows not on my list.

    Hallmark

    A couple movie mysteries. I’m happy to state that I’ve not watched Hallmark in weeks though.

    Classics

    Platinum Blonde. Eh, some funny lines, but overall, eh.

    Period Drama

    Middlemarch. Interesting (and awkward, I skimmed parts, intentionally awkward, British authors do know how to write some awkward situations, they just happen to be excruciating to watch). A couple of recognized actors or siblings of actors (of course, I feel like I’ve seen every not-super-famous British actor/actress multiple times, it can be interesting, it can be annoying if you know, Fudge is in everything, that actor IS Fudge in everything). I don’t feel it does the book justice AT ALL. I’m now wanting to reread it again.

    Television

    Monk. I’ve been hearing about this show/meaning to watch it for ages, and I’ve been going through it with my grandparents. It’s so funny and cute, despite being murder mysteries. Thus far, the mystery element hasn’t been great (and that’s saying a lot, I’ve watched Hallmark mysteries), but at least it hasn’t scared me too much. It’s the characters who are interesting. We started at the beginning which was made in 2002, but which if I didn’t know it, I would have said the 90’s since apparently 90’s styles extended into the early 2000’s (ugh). Apparently, 90’s is resurfacing too, but in cuter ways (scrunchies, I still cringe a little though).

  • Daily Life

    1st Quarter Goals Revisited

    I think that I will just focus on what I DID accomplish.

    • Made much more than I did this time last year
    • Read 40 books (!!!!), 8 of these are nonfiction and 2 re-reads
    • Worked a side gig
    • Got a temp job (one that I don’t want to quit every single day)
    • Have an A (cumulative) in my three CIT classes thus far
    • Signed up for two summer classes
    • Finished two knitting projects
    • Started workable planning and habit systems for me
    • Have generally been more optimistic
  • Daily Life

    March 2019 Goals Revisited

    I need to “course correct” (an excellent concept I picked up in The Slight Edge) for this month, so a lot of items are going to be copy and paste from February.

    Wellness

    • Get back on track with habits. Not exactly, I did excellent on Duolingo, though.
    • Prep meals regularly. Partially.
    • Start facial care routine. Yes.
    • Start a weekly reset habit (Sat/Sun?), get back on track with daily routines. No.
    • Double down on the health habits. Ahaha . . . no.
    • Set up tech guards, habits, and sabbaths. Worse than no.
    • Be aware of needs to be vigilante on my habits (they slip more easily in certain circumstances) No.
    • Work on room. No.

    Financial

    • Have enough to pay 1st quarter’s obligation, a little in emergency fund. Partially.
    • Pay off credit card bill. Yes.
    • Finish paying loan back. Partially.
    • Make a certain minimum amount. Yes.
    • Have a now spend/lowest spend month. Ouch, NO.
    • Get a temporary job. Yes.

    Personal Development

    • Read 8-9 books, including: 4 nonfiction, 1-2 Classics Club reads, and catch up and keep up on War and Peace on Serial ReaderPartially, I read 15 fiction books.
    • 2 major knitting projects and 1-2 small ones. I finished two projects, well the knitting part of them; I still need to block both and buy and add buttons to one.
    • 2 major sewing projects. No.
    • Begin taking mini-adventures/explorations. No.
    • Determine next Spanish steps. No, I’m going to keep on what I’m doing now for the time being.
    • Determine next graphic design steps. No, I’m going to keep on what I’m doing now for the time being.
  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Things That Make Me Pick Up A Book

    I’m going to go mostly with what causes me to pick up a book I’ve borrowed from the library, not so much with what causes me to choose what book to add to my hundreds of titles long (I’ll have a better estimate eventually, I don’t think it’s 1000, but I might be wrong) TBR list or what causes me to choose which books off my TBR list.

    1. To get and stay off the web
    2. Comfort (escapism, avoidance)
    3. I know I will likely enjoy it (I’ve read other books by the same author)
    4. Curiosity
    5. Procrastination
    6. Contrariness (avoiding other books I think I *should* be reading)
    7. Determination (those books I *should* be reading)
    8. To learn/stay motivated
    9. Because I’ve exhausted my other book options
    10. Because I fell for the hype
  • Daily Life

    Blog Update: All My Old Posts Are Available Now

    I couldn’t figure out or did something wrong when trying to transfer my blogger blog posts over the first time. But for some reason, I only had to try one thing this time (pretty sure it was redoing what I did before), and it worked. So all the posts that I left on my old blog are available here now. I’ve also updated my template and added tags, so I’m pretty pleased with myself. I’ve also updated some of my pages as well.

    I rejoined the Classics Club, so I will be writing more individual reviews, and I feel like I’m getting more motivation back to write more opinion posts. For awhile I was burned out and just burned on opinions (still don’t love rants and opinions-presented-as-sermons-or-facts . . . for obvious reasons). I think I’m better able to think through things and to write in a way that is perhaps less antagonizing? I want to try to utilize my book journal more (that makes it easier to write more thoughtful reviews and opinion posts) and just put more thought into things. I think I’ve been reading too passively and quickly recently.

  • Reading

    What I Read: March 2019

    I read 15 books in March.

    Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes. This was a reread. I’d conveniently rewritten out a significant and sad part of the plot in my head apparently. Also, hindsight is 20/20; I don’t think the thought is perhaps accurate to the time. Nevertheless, I enjoyed it, and it did help renew my interest in my country’s founding. At least I hope, I still have not picked up the book that has caused by (apparently many years long) study of U.S. to stall. Perhaps I need to revisit Liberty’s Kids?! Yes, that’s a good excuse.

    Cotillion, Black Sheep, and Friday’s Child by Georgette Heyer. These all got a 3 star from me. Cotillion was old rake free. The couple were both young, both had personalities, and it was funny and sweet. Back to regular scheduling of course with Black Sheep (as implied by the title), I still found this fun. Cotillion featured (for you know a little variety) a very young rake and his basically child-bride. She was more of a prop (why do her young heroines generally feature zero real personality?), but the “hero” and his coterie and the scrapes his bride get into and just the wit, and everything altogether is absolutely hysterical, this almost got a four.

    Betsy-Tacy, Betsy-Tacy and Tib, Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown, Winona’s Pony Cart, Heaven to Betsy, Betsy in Spite of Herself, Betsy Was a Junior, Betsy and Joe, Carney’s House Party, and Emily of Deep Valley by Maud Hart Lovelace. These were not the classic sweet novels I was hoping for, they were rather flat and silly, except the Deep Valley ones (the ones that don’t feature Betsy in the title, but don’t unfortunately repeat the omission in the books), those were MUCH better although far from classic level excellent. I read them in the order listed as that was the recommended chronological order. After Carney’s House party were two more Betsy books, but when I picked them up, the quality, Betsy, and probably the contrast of Carney’s House party caused me to opt in disgust not finish those. Emily of Deep Valley, I think, fell before Carney’s House Party, but I’d saved it for last as it was supposed to be the best. It could’ve been but it wasn’t, it failed to live up to the dust jacket description. The pacing was poor on the plot and the depth increasingly shallow even though the subject matter deepens. I still enjoyed it though.

  • Reading

    What I Read: February 2019

    Random note, apparently there are people in the world who can pronounce February with that first “r.” Needless to say, I’m not one of them. I actually had to stop and think when I heard that (on Jeopardy) to make sure I knew how to spell it right, I do, it’s autopilot. Anyway.

    Scholarly Nonfiction
    Viruses: A Very Short Introduction. I’m going with the medical field to start off my reading through this Oxford University Press collection. A lot of this is beyond me (maybe I should start taking notes) as it’s very detailed, and I’m more, I don’t know big picture? Not cellular level definitely, I’m looking forward to epidemiology, pandemics, etc.

    Light Nonfiction
    Off the Clock. I loved some of her ideas for memory making, but I have totally different personality (beach bum and rebellious type, lol) and perspective so overall this main points/aim aren’t/isn’t for me.

    Thinking with Type. I read this as part of this self-directed “course” in graphic design. It seems rather abstract and esoteric in parts, but I will probably go back to it for the more practical aspects. I’m definitely analog here though, greatly prefer the ancient practice of calligraphy.

    The Four Tendencies.

    • I’d heard of this before but didn’t look into it very deeply as personality tests/typing can be really obnoxious in their unscientific, unrealistic claims. When MuchelleB mentioned it in one of her videos and mentioned that she was REBEL/Questioner, I thought that sounded like me (this explains why I find so much of her advice/tips so helpful, rather unusual for me), so I read the book. I’m definitely that type.
    • I find this framework (it’s not a personality test ) extremely interesting and practically useful. I didn’t however, find it ground-breaking. Also, I’d already known much about my tendencies already, and I didn’t find what I wanted (job advice); actually beyond the initial explanations, I found much of the advice overly-generalized opinions, the Rebel section, especially.
    • The author seemed to rely too much of the obvious cultural connotation/stereotypes of Rebels. For example, she mentions obeying speed laws and mentions Questioners and Rebels as resisting this. I don’t, in fact, I’m the strictest person I know on driving, and I know our speeding laws are lax (we have so many road deaths near us in perfectly good weather). But I think my reasons might be different than say her personal Upholder tendencies.
    • Also, I think perhaps her being an Upholder affected her view. She seemed to say Upholder’s followed rules because they were rules. I don’t follow petty rules or say-so’s, but I consider morals, ethics, and laws paramount; I don’t even consider them as comparable with “rules.” This is a whole other topic I could chase.

    The Slight Edge. I found a lot of good ideas and took notes, but I definitely think that this could’ve been reduced by two-thirds.

    Light Fiction
    Conrad’s Fate. This is the last of the Chrestomanci’s books (that I hadn’t read). Not my favorite (clearly, since I forgot what it was about and had to look on Goodreads).

    The Golden Tresses of the Dead. These books have such a fun setting/tone, and there are some hilarious lines in almost all of them, and Flavia is quite a personality. However, I think that there is quite a bit in poor taste in all the books, some more than others. In this one, the mystery and ending was also sub-par compared to the rest.

    Veiled Rose. After reading the first of the Tales of Goldstone Woods, I stalled on this the second. I almost didn’t finish it, I skimmed to see if it turned out like I wanted and discovered via the other books that this plot is strung out while new stories and characters were focused on with more and more books. That (and the fact that there was yet ANOTHER book my library didn’t have) killed my interest in the series for a time. I think maybe I will slowly work my way through them. These were surprisingly “good” from a Christian AND homeschool author (my indicators that books are going to be TERRIBLE since everyone in homeschool circles seems to think they are a writer and Christian Fiction is a ludicrously absurdly terrible genre). I don’t think the author should have strung out a series to be this long. I also think that if she worked and reworked her books she could have something of a much higher caliber (I think that is an issue in today’s writing, in part due to the publishing industry, this lack of time and extensive drafting of books and this push to churn out tons of works).

    Frederica. I’m still on a Heyer kick, but I’m trying to space them out. Another middle-aged (okay, maybe not that old) rake again. Really, Heyer. The heroine has a brain and personality though (she gives all the on-the-shelf 28-ish ladies personalities and brains).

    Sprig Muslin. Not a rake AND they are of close age. However, most of the book focuses on a really obnoxious silly, stupid young girl (the type the old rake usually marries, usually sans the obnoxiousness, that would indicate something of a personality, lol) that the hero has to babysit and that everyone of course thinks is his mistress.