The Original English Accent

When Brits get irritated with us about “their language” or us mentioning their accent:

 

  1. It’s our language too, and some of us are literally the same people.
  2. We literally have a ton more English speakers.
  3. And most to the point I’d heard (and have now confirmed), we actually have less of accent change than the Brits did. Can I just say this is hilarious? We didn’t as much develop an American accent (that did happen though) as much as the British accent changed.

 

I’d love to hear what the original accent (or rather accents, I’m sure regionally it varied as well which also probably affected the American accent) sounded like.

 

Also I say we, but I’m not sure which American accent would be the closest, maybe the South, less other influences, less movement? Also apparently some Northeastern areas are non-rhotic thanks to influence of the (relatively) newer non-rhotic British English.

 

Also, this applies to Canada obviously too. But why is Canada still grouped with the UK, South Africa, and Australia and New Zealand in English? You all don’t say things like “zed” and “haitch” (I can’t express how that sound makes me gag), do you?

 

4 comments

  1. I’ve always wondered why some regions have vastly different accents even if they’re speaking the same language and what prompts the change exactly.
    Or how some dumb things spread like why is the ‘why did the chicken cross the road’ joke so wildly known. Who started handshakes and why is that something we all do?

    1. It’s all so fascinating. I bet there is a history of handshakes someone. I’ll be happy if they never come back after covid though. I much happier with a touchless greeting.

    2. It’s all so fascination. I bet there is a history of handshakes somewhere. I’ll be happy if they and any other touchy greeting never come back after covid though as I dislike being touched.

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