• Reading

    Peter Pan Review

    I remember that I watched Disney’s Peter Pan over a decade ago.

    I tried to read the book Peter Pan a couple of years ago but could not get into it.

    I read/skimmed some of Gail Carson Levine’s Tinkerbell fairy books and watched some of the Disney fairy movies (I have yet to see the one with the pirates in which Someone AMAZING voices Hook). I assume that the Disney fairies are based off her books, but I have yet to research the connection.

    Then I read Peter and the Starcatchers. I sped through the four in this series and then the book that is sort of a sequel to the series. AAHMAZING!

    Then we watched the adorable (although not squeaky clean) live action version with the adorable Peter and Lucius Malfoy’s Jason Isaac’s Hook.

    So, after I became quite a cheat and traitor on account of watching movies and reading spin-offs first, I finally read the original. The book didn’t seem quite as dry as I remembered, but it lacked some sparkle. But still, none of the aforementioned adaptations would exist without it. The original Peter is QUITE a bit more obnoxious than the other renditions of him, especially because he is SO forgetful. I don’t like that at all. And the original also plays up Peter’s desire to forever remain a child to the point of making the book a moral story which is a bit annoying. I at least appreciate the novel for the creativity it inspired.

  • Reading

    100 Cupboards Trilogy

    I finished the last book of this series, The Chestnut King, a couple weeks ago. I absolutely adore this trilogy. I was obsessed with them, and I did not quite know what to do with myself when they were finished. (I have problem with obsessing instead of merely enjoying; I am currently obsessed with Pysch-I got over the first episode yuck)

    They are entirely juvenile fiction, so do not expect the sophistication that comes with adult literature or the angst that comes with teen novels. They are also not epic novels, so do not expect the grandeur of the Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter or the melodrama of the Hunger Games and the Twilight Saga. I know I sound really negative, but I adore these so much I could not stand for someone to dislike them because they were expecting something else (actually don’t desecrate the books by reading them if there is the slightest possibility that you would not like them), and that is why I want to make perfectly clear what these novels are; so that no one would read them and be disappointed. So if you are expecting any of the above descriptions do not read the books. Okay, I am done with that little warning/explanation/ defense/rant 😀

    I enjoyed N. D. Wilson’s Dragon’s Tooth (the first novel in his newest series, Ashtown Burials) and the stand alone Leepike Ridge, but this particular trilogy stands in its own very special place. I truly believe it is considerably better imagined and written than either of the other novels (although I am certainly happy that the second book of the Ashtown Burials is out now, and I plan to read it).

    I do not want to write too much because I don’t want to giveaway anything at all. If you start the books you MUST read all three; do not give up after the first one because I will admit that unless you are careful you might think that there are no more hidden special secrets.

    I just love the writing style. There is a little suspense and the answers to the suspense perfectly fit in; these books do not feel like they are being stretched out or rung for one more drop of drama. I could almost not believe how seamless the plot in this trilogy was. I am not good at describing all the arts and forms of writing, but I believe these books are supremely well written pieces of juvenile literature. Suffice it to say that if you are a juvenile fiction fantasy nut you MUST read these.