• Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Unpopular Bookish Opinions

    I don’t know if all of these are unpopular, they are just opinions/arguments (not the same thing) I rarely see expressed or are expressed and then scorned. But I have a limited exposure.

    A lot of these are my ideals. I’m SUCH a mood reader. I feel like I need some escapist reading. I don’t read near enough deep books. But I do think that I should, I just have to have a lot of easy (but still quality) reading on hand, plus ways of planning and motivating myself.

    1. Show, don’t tell. If I feel like the author is telling me something, forcing something, rather than displaying it, then they’ve failed to convince me (ahem, Jo and Laurie). Books aren’t mere explanations, they are story, art (perfection, okay, maybe an exaggeration). A reason, I think for my avoidance of contemporary fiction.
    2. Prose, description, characterization, interpersonal relationships, wit, etc. are more important than plot to me, and, (I think) in terms of literary merit at least equal to plot. I feel that this is also why I dislike so much of contemporary writing.
    3. I dislike the didactic in all forms, and obvious preaching isn’t art, even though some obviously gifted people squeeze it into their books. This goes back to showing, not telling. Y’all, I could find a preacher for anything, but I don’t want preaching, thanks, there is far too much of it already. And I’ve had far too much of it already (and probably done too much of it . . . like now, lol). Again, another reason I tend to avoid contemporary fiction.
    4. I like my realism idealized (I’m wanting to explore this more later). Basically, when I’m reading a “real” life setting, I’d like it to be idealized, not perfect, just not sordid or mundane or petty.
    5. Gritty “true to life” isn’t an asset (and isn’t necessarily true to life). Dark doesn’t equal deep. “Realism” can be vicarious reading or voyeurism. I want to escape reality and/or have my mind, ideals, etc. uplifted.
    6. I like my fantasy realistic. I don’t even know how to describe what I mean about that, but maybe I just mean well-written? I guess I want believable circumstances in a fantasy world, exciting, fanciful, yes, but still “human” I guess? Actually, now that I’m thinking of it, I generally prefer, low fantasy, and this is probably part of why.
    7. Quality over quality. All books are NOT equally good, well-written, etc. Taste and comprehension are two different things. You can like different genres from other people. But sometimes one genre may be notorious for being shallow and silly.
    8. Reading is not a hobby. Everyone who can read is a reader. People who don’t regularly read are still readers. Everyone should read as a form of mental exercise, to learn, to be inspired, I think reading for entertainment is good, but that is not the sole purpose of reading, rather an additional purpose.
    9. Interpretation isn’t up to the readers. Reading comprehension matters, like listening matters.  The author chose specific words, for specific reasons. Obviously, we are going to disagree, not understand, view things through our own lenses. But we should try to understand what the author is saying. And then form opinions on what is said, described, etc. Not the actual meanings.
    10. Reading well matters. Our brains are muscles, reading well is important to our personal development, to our knowledge, to our comprehension, to our families, to our culture, to society, to life. And I don’t mean “current” event copy+paste type reading. I mean read just a tad beyond your comprehension, and then when you get comfortable, a tad more beyond that.
  • Reading

    What I Read: April and May 2019

    Children’s Lit

    Continuing on from earlier this year in children’s lighter classics that I didn’t read as a child.

    Knight’s Castle by Edward Eager. I read Half-Magic ages ago but forgot everything about it. This is fun, I’m reading more of the series, but it’s not the most thrilling middle-grade lit for adults.

    All-of-a-Kind Family, All-Of-A-Kind Family Downtown, More All-of-a-Kind Family, All-of-a-Kind Family Uptown by Sydney Taylor. These are okay, not the most interesting in tone and description, rather didactic, definitely a lower reading level than middle grade. I ended up DNF-ing the last book, a juvenile tone and writing style doesn’t work with adult life.

    The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright. This is far closer to the sweet spot for excellent children’s literature, and I think I want to get more of these for vacation reading.

    Henry Huggins by Beverly Cleary. This is below middle-grade, definitely want future kids to read or to read aloud with them but just not inspiring enough/high enough grade level for an adult although I’d still like to try Ramona Quimby because I’ve heard those are more popular.

    What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge. I saw a gorgeously illustrated set of this series on a British Instagrammer’s page, it turns out they are American but for some reason I got the impression that they were less popular here, the reprint has a note from a British lady. I guess I thought that was odd, it feels like its usually the other way around usually? Also this kinda has that classic American North moralizing (the Northern authors moralize; the Southern authors write about crazy, and I mean CRAZY, people; and the Midwest authors manage to make everything banal, despairing, and demoralizing in my little, ironically, exposure to the grown-up American Classic scene) without the charm of better authors (think Alcott). At first I wasn’t sure I wanted to read more, but those covers! Maybe the others are better?

    The Changeling, The Truce Of The Games, Shifting Sands by Rosemary Sutcliff. And now for the taste of genius. I’ve exhausted most of the best novels of Sutcliff and had been getting some of her less inspiring reads. But these short stories that are part of an older children’s collection, are the true Sutcliff storytelling magic. I think that she wrote more of these (they are published by or part of Antelope books and feature woodcut illustrations, I believe), but I’ve had to get them a few at a time through interlibrary loans.

    ReReads

    The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare. This, thanks to my more capable reading abilities plus age, is much shorter than my memory of it. Also, Puritan stereotypes are still annoying as heck. This is sheer historical ignorance, for example black was a GOOD color, a wealthy color for Puritans. Per David Hackett Fisher in my beloved Albion’s Seed Puritans were far more egalitarian (second to the Quakers who were the most) in gender roles and economics than the two Southern cultures (he divides early developing U.S. into four basic cultures coming from four in England) which would’ve have been more similar to Kit’s, I’d imagine, and she’s just used to being on the top too. So, a lot of this story is just nonsense. A lot of this just feels like modern projecting based on some dramatic events without any understanding of the overall times. Nat’s still awesome though.

    My Escapist Reads

    False Colours, Arabella by Georgette Heyer. These were both 3 stars for me, the first featured identical twins as hero and side character, one normal, one a rake. The second featured a girl with a brain . . . and a rake for a hero. Well you, know, that’s her favorite “hero.” I decided to take a break to keep any other Heyers in reserve.

    So then, I started on Mary Stewart and MM Kaye and found another therapeutic reads, of course I’ve mostly exhausted Kaye as she didn’t write very many.

    Death in Cyprus by MM Kaye and The Moon-Spinners and This Rough Magic by Mary Stewart which I read in that order and fairly close together (followed up by Death in Zanzibar), and I kind of started blending the author’s styles a bit, they are both British, suspense for the former, mystery for the latter; have a lot of similarity in the hero-types; and hilariously, were each set on an Island in the the eastern Mediterrean starting with a “c”: Cyprus (no, really?), Crete, and Corfu, respectively. I greatly enjoyed all three. I’m so glad I started both authors like this and read these books in this order, it just fit so well, and I highly recommended anyone new to these authors to do this.

    The Ivy Tree (My least favorite Stewart, I preferred the villain, I kept hoping against hope he wasn’t the villain, I hate the inclusion of infidelity, that was the love story, also, just not a great love story, period, rather sickening.)

    Wildfire at Midnight (Not super crazy about this one, also has a bit freaky stuff, again, cheaters. And the women are just supposed to ignore and forgive the not-truly-repentant cheaters to “keep” them. NO.)

    Nine Coaches Waiting (I think my expectations were too high as I adore the first two I read, and this is the most famous and didn’t match those first two in tone for me.)

    My Brother Michael (I really enjoyed parts, but kind of felt choppy in quality, also, be careful with this one, I feel like trigger warnings are needed, there is a psychopath here and some sexual stuff, one part is pretty awful, not rape although I thought for a bit it was implied in different episode which without the first I wouldn’t have thought at all, but then Simon and Camilla were too calm in their response, but it doesn’t stretch to the imagination that the villain would; anyhow, this is darker than the others.)

    Madam Will You Talk? (This one was thrilling, for more overall evenly intriguing but still doesn’t come close to my original favs.)

    Thunder on the Right (Eh, far more buildup than delivery.)

    The Wind off the Small Isles (This was an enjoyable short story.)

    All by Mary Stewart. A lot of my liking of these novels involves her evocative settings, so if I didn’t like the settings/her descriptions just didn’t match the atmosphere of previous ones, that fact was also mixed with any dislike of the story.

    Death in Zanzibar, Death in Kashmir by MM Kaye. The former is up there with Death in Cyprus, the latter is enjoyable. I DNFed Death in Kenya. I think there is two that I have ordered/will order via interlibrary loan.

    Westerns

    True Grit by Charles Portis. Eh.

    Shane by Jack. Eh, but in the hands of a better author could’ve been awesome.

    I’m going to keep trying, albeit slowly, on Westerns, though.

    Random

    Arthur by Stephen R Lawhead. I have Pendragon (the 4th book), but I think I’m done with this series for now. I felt so lost and felt that the author was as well.

    Motivational

    Outer Order Inner Calm by Gretchen Rubin. This isn’t really a book, rather a collection of organizational/personal environment ideas. I felt it “spoke my language,” others may not feel so. I think motivational/self-help books are VERY specific to each person, I mean within the exact same topic, if one author doesn’t work for you, find another.

    When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H Pink. Eh, considerably overstretched the “scientific” aspect, if you could even call it that; books like this and The Happiness Advantage (I DNF’ed for this reason, the lack of new concepts, and the tone) tend to stick “scientific” in quite too often and, I think, not very accurately. Sorry, not every scholarly study, undertaking, etc. is scientific. Also, protesting too much.

    The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness by Dave Ramsey. Overall, great basic money advice. As with everything can be tailored to personal situation (something I didn’t realize in my foolish youth with his first book). Don’t agree about no credit cards, nor about super specific budgets all the time, ain’t gonna happen for this girl. But all the way there for the emergency fund!!!

    I Will Teach You to Be Rich by Ramit Sethi. He speaks my language, and I find him hilarious. He also writes more for my age and situation. I want to get the newer copy of this book for myself. I agree with more of what he had to say/the way he said it than Ramsey although, truly, the overall advice isn’t wildly different (no helpful financial advice is at bare bones). But I found Sethi’s breakdown extremely helpful to me.

  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books of the Last 10 Years

    I thought this was really creative/fun/easy topic. I don’t pay too much attention to specific publication dates, more to decades/centuries/eras, so I was curious to see what would come up for me. I exported my Goodreads library and cutting down out extra columns, I managed to look at the years 2018-2009 on publication dates for books I’d rated 4 or 5 stars. I aimed for fiction when I could, but a few years I only had nonfiction. If there were two, and I thought that I preferred one over the other, I picked that. If there were two, and I thought both were equally deserving, I put both. I’m pretty sure I’ve featured most of the fiction on TTT multiple times, but what can I say, I love my favorites, and I’m quite picky. But, somebody PLEASE give Faerie Rebels  and the Swift duo more attention.

    • 2018 Book Girl: A Journey Through the Treasures and Transforming Power of a Reading Life by Sarah Clarkson
    • 2017 The Vanishing American Adult by Ben Sasse
    • 2016 The Key to Extraordinary by Natalie Lloyd (a standalone middle-grade novel, my favorite of hers, Appalachian magic, like the first, which I love; I usually think magic belongs in Old World settings, but there are specific areas/cultures where it fits in the New World, and Appalachia is one)
    • 2015 The Penderwicks in Spring by Jeanne Birdsall (book four of The Penderwicks)
    • 2014 Nomad by R.J. Anderson (the second book of Swift duo, was supposed to be trilogy, but that hasn’t come and might not come, mourning)
    • 2013 Death by Living by N.D. Wilson
    • 2012 Swift by R.J. Anderson (book one of Swift, a continuation of the world from Faerie Rebels)
    • 2011 Entwined by Heather Dixon (a slight eery yet lovely retelling of the Twelve Dancing Princesses fairytale) and The Penderwicks at Point Mouette by Jeanne Birdsall (book three in a charming middle-grade series about four sisters)
    • 2010 The Chesnut King by N.D. Wilson (the third book in The 100 Cupboards trilogy, a wonderful middle-grade fantasy trilogy)
    • 2009 Knife and Rebel by R.J. Anderson (books one and two of the Faerie Rebels series, an awesome fantasy series that straddles the line between middle grade and teen like Harry Potter)
  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Characters That Remind Me of Myself

    I’m picking characters with at least some similar personality characteristics , I’m not sure I think any or most of them are exactly like me. The first 5  are characters with similar personalities (i.e. rather brash/emotional/out of control types); generally speaking NOT the oldest sibling who seem to always be cast in the quiet, responsible cast, again, ouch. The other characters are those with traits I see in myself but who are not otherwise very similar.

    I’m wanting to do a post about how so often, I’m like the traditional portrayal of tomboys in personality, but not in outlook or tastes or goals or bravado/bravery. Many of the characters with my outlook, tastes, and goals are meek, sweet, or annoyingly poised. Then also, there are the uptight, old-maid characters whose opinions/outlook I can relate too. OW!

    1. Marianne Dashwood from Sense and Sensibility. I also get Marianne on these quizzes.
    2. Jo March from Little Women. The unbridled tongue and temper, um yes. The tomboyishness, no. (Rose in Rose in Bloom and Eight Cousins is a well-balanced character now that I’m thinking Alcott characters)
    3.  Skye from The Penderwicks series (the “Jo” of this loosely modern middle-grade version of Little Women). Again, the brashness.
    4. Laura of the Little House books. Just generally being the one who gets in trouble, particularly because of her words. Overall my childhood personality and proclivities were similar, outdoors and a bit rebellious but still not a tomboy.
    5. Oh, and this one is going to be good. Susan Pevensie. There have been a couple defenses of Susan Pevensie recently, more or less with the same criticisms of the book that I first saw years ago from a favorite author. However, I disagree with all of them, and Susan is definitely my least favorite of most of the children. And yet, a lot of what I see to dislike in Susan, I see in myself (bossiness mainly, for example). I think I’ll save more of my opinions for when I re-read Narnia, hopefully in the near future.
    6. Johnny Tremain, from Johnny Tremain. Quick spoken, quick tempered. Sense a pattern here?
    7. Catherine Morland from Northanger Abbey. No, overall I’m not like here, but I’ve frequently, particularly when I was younger, exhibited a great deal of her gullibility.
    8. Donna in a Tangled Web. Pretty sure that’s exactly how I would act in love (also, see below). Peter and Donna are absolutely the most ludicrous, hilarious over the top people. Of course, I can also see myself making a goose of myself like Jocelyn too though.
    9. Mara, in Mara, Daughter of the Nile. Now, this is going to sound vain, “Oh, yes, I’m exactly like a clever double spy!” No, what I mean is I’m rather (!!!) readable and manipulatable, like Mara is to Sheftu, he knows all along how much she is attracted to him and toys her with it. This aspect is similar to many of the older Heyer heroines.
    10. Every unimaginative character in L. M. Montgomery books. Yes, I’ve always been the literal person, however much I now want to be like Anne or Emily or Pat.
  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday: Things That Make Me Pick Up A Book

    I’m going to go mostly with what causes me to pick up a book I’ve borrowed from the library, not so much with what causes me to choose what book to add to my hundreds of titles long (I’ll have a better estimate eventually, I don’t think it’s 1000, but I might be wrong) TBR list or what causes me to choose which books off my TBR list.

    1. To get and stay off the web
    2. Comfort (escapism, avoidance)
    3. I know I will likely enjoy it (I’ve read other books by the same author)
    4. Curiosity
    5. Procrastination
    6. Contrariness (avoiding other books I think I *should* be reading)
    7. Determination (those books I *should* be reading)
    8. To learn/stay motivated
    9. Because I’ve exhausted my other book options
    10. Because I fell for the hype
  • Reading

    What I Read: March 2019

    I read 15 books in March.

    Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes. This was a reread. I’d conveniently rewritten out a significant and sad part of the plot in my head apparently. Also, hindsight is 20/20; I don’t think the thought is perhaps accurate to the time. Nevertheless, I enjoyed it, and it did help renew my interest in my country’s founding. At least I hope, I still have not picked up the book that has caused by (apparently many years long) study of U.S. to stall. Perhaps I need to revisit Liberty’s Kids?! Yes, that’s a good excuse.

    Cotillion, Black Sheep, and Friday’s Child by Georgette Heyer. These all got a 3 star from me. Cotillion was old rake free. The couple were both young, both had personalities, and it was funny and sweet. Back to regular scheduling of course with Black Sheep (as implied by the title), I still found this fun. Cotillion featured (for you know a little variety) a very young rake and his basically child-bride. She was more of a prop (why do her young heroines generally feature zero real personality?), but the “hero” and his coterie and the scrapes his bride get into and just the wit, and everything altogether is absolutely hysterical, this almost got a four.

    Betsy-Tacy, Betsy-Tacy and Tib, Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown, Winona’s Pony Cart, Heaven to Betsy, Betsy in Spite of Herself, Betsy Was a Junior, Betsy and Joe, Carney’s House Party, and Emily of Deep Valley by Maud Hart Lovelace. These were not the classic sweet novels I was hoping for, they were rather flat and silly, except the Deep Valley ones (the ones that don’t feature Betsy in the title, but don’t unfortunately repeat the omission in the books), those were MUCH better although far from classic level excellent. I read them in the order listed as that was the recommended chronological order. After Carney’s House party were two more Betsy books, but when I picked them up, the quality, Betsy, and probably the contrast of Carney’s House party caused me to opt in disgust not finish those. Emily of Deep Valley, I think, fell before Carney’s House Party, but I’d saved it for last as it was supposed to be the best. It could’ve been but it wasn’t, it failed to live up to the dust jacket description. The pacing was poor on the plot and the depth increasingly shallow even though the subject matter deepens. I still enjoyed it though.

  • Reading

    What I Read: February 2019

    Random note, apparently there are people in the world who can pronounce February with that first “r.” Needless to say, I’m not one of them. I actually had to stop and think when I heard that (on Jeopardy) to make sure I knew how to spell it right, I do, it’s autopilot. Anyway.

    Scholarly Nonfiction
    Viruses: A Very Short Introduction. I’m going with the medical field to start off my reading through this Oxford University Press collection. A lot of this is beyond me (maybe I should start taking notes) as it’s very detailed, and I’m more, I don’t know big picture? Not cellular level definitely, I’m looking forward to epidemiology, pandemics, etc.

    Light Nonfiction
    Off the Clock. I loved some of her ideas for memory making, but I have totally different personality (beach bum and rebellious type, lol) and perspective so overall this main points/aim aren’t/isn’t for me.

    Thinking with Type. I read this as part of this self-directed “course” in graphic design. It seems rather abstract and esoteric in parts, but I will probably go back to it for the more practical aspects. I’m definitely analog here though, greatly prefer the ancient practice of calligraphy.

    The Four Tendencies.

    • I’d heard of this before but didn’t look into it very deeply as personality tests/typing can be really obnoxious in their unscientific, unrealistic claims. When MuchelleB mentioned it in one of her videos and mentioned that she was REBEL/Questioner, I thought that sounded like me (this explains why I find so much of her advice/tips so helpful, rather unusual for me), so I read the book. I’m definitely that type.
    • I find this framework (it’s not a personality test ) extremely interesting and practically useful. I didn’t however, find it ground-breaking. Also, I’d already known much about my tendencies already, and I didn’t find what I wanted (job advice); actually beyond the initial explanations, I found much of the advice overly-generalized opinions, the Rebel section, especially.
    • The author seemed to rely too much of the obvious cultural connotation/stereotypes of Rebels. For example, she mentions obeying speed laws and mentions Questioners and Rebels as resisting this. I don’t, in fact, I’m the strictest person I know on driving, and I know our speeding laws are lax (we have so many road deaths near us in perfectly good weather). But I think my reasons might be different than say her personal Upholder tendencies.
    • Also, I think perhaps her being an Upholder affected her view. She seemed to say Upholder’s followed rules because they were rules. I don’t follow petty rules or say-so’s, but I consider morals, ethics, and laws paramount; I don’t even consider them as comparable with “rules.” This is a whole other topic I could chase.

    The Slight Edge. I found a lot of good ideas and took notes, but I definitely think that this could’ve been reduced by two-thirds.

    Light Fiction
    Conrad’s Fate. This is the last of the Chrestomanci’s books (that I hadn’t read). Not my favorite (clearly, since I forgot what it was about and had to look on Goodreads).

    The Golden Tresses of the Dead. These books have such a fun setting/tone, and there are some hilarious lines in almost all of them, and Flavia is quite a personality. However, I think that there is quite a bit in poor taste in all the books, some more than others. In this one, the mystery and ending was also sub-par compared to the rest.

    Veiled Rose. After reading the first of the Tales of Goldstone Woods, I stalled on this the second. I almost didn’t finish it, I skimmed to see if it turned out like I wanted and discovered via the other books that this plot is strung out while new stories and characters were focused on with more and more books. That (and the fact that there was yet ANOTHER book my library didn’t have) killed my interest in the series for a time. I think maybe I will slowly work my way through them. These were surprisingly “good” from a Christian AND homeschool author (my indicators that books are going to be TERRIBLE since everyone in homeschool circles seems to think they are a writer and Christian Fiction is a ludicrously absurdly terrible genre). I don’t think the author should have strung out a series to be this long. I also think that if she worked and reworked her books she could have something of a much higher caliber (I think that is an issue in today’s writing, in part due to the publishing industry, this lack of time and extensive drafting of books and this push to churn out tons of works).

    Frederica. I’m still on a Heyer kick, but I’m trying to space them out. Another middle-aged (okay, maybe not that old) rake again. Really, Heyer. The heroine has a brain and personality though (she gives all the on-the-shelf 28-ish ladies personalities and brains).

    Sprig Muslin. Not a rake AND they are of close age. However, most of the book focuses on a really obnoxious silly, stupid young girl (the type the old rake usually marries, usually sans the obnoxiousness, that would indicate something of a personality, lol) that the hero has to babysit and that everyone of course thinks is his mistress.

  • Reading

    Top Ten Tuesday February 26: Places Mentioned In Books That I’d Like to Visit

    I want to go to more places from this list, but I’m trying to find ones that have a distinct literary connection for me. Many books are set in places I want to visit, but the books themselves don’t inspire me with their descriptions or lack thereof. And then there are places for which I have no literary connotation, but perhaps a historical or movie or genealogical interest for me instead. Anyway, I just feel that some of my favorite books are all in one place and perhaps books I didn’t like so well had geographic interest (but I can’t remember them). And of course tons places in England will have literary connections for me, but I’m trying to find the ones that match with favorites or have a vivid literary connotation for me.

    1. Yorkshire Dales (James Herriot books)
    2. London (Lord Peter Wimsey novels)
    3. Wales (Rosemary Sutcliff books)
    4. Cornwall (Rosemary Sutcliff and Swift and Nomad)
    5. Hadrian’s Wall and the Antontine wall (Eagle of the Ninth)
    6. Prince Edward Island (L.M. Montgomery novels)
    7. Mackinaw Island (Once on this Island, Girl of the Limberlost)
    8. Switzerland (Little Women, Heidi, Treasures of the Snow)
    9. Egypt (well . . . specifically Ancient Egypt with Sheftu) (Mara, Daughter of the Nile)
    10. New Zealand (closest I can get to Middle Earth) (Lord of the Rings)

     

  • Reading

    What I Read: January 2019

    Rereads

    The Best School Year Ever by Barbara Robinson. I realized when reading this that I’d read this as a child. Funny enough I guess, but maybe not quite as much (nor as endearing) as the Christmas one.

    Popular Nonfiction

    Them: Why We Hate Each Other and How to Heal by Ben Sasse. He can be SO Luddite-sounding, even though he claims not to be. I had trouble with the first part of the book, I think he tries to reach everyone, but I don’t find it accurate, and I don’t think he should be making some of the claims he does without statistics. The end (the actionable part) is far more encouraging (similar to the other book, except that book was mainly actionable). One of the best parts (if not the best) is his highlighting and explaining the difference between civics and politics, something I hold to be highly important.

    The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod. This is good for motivation if you are in the right place for it. It could definitely lose some repetitiveness and be made into a booklet.

    The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish by Linda Przybyszewski. This had interesting information, but quite frankly, I’m not sure what her point ended up being. I think her thesis was that a group of home economics educators played a pivotal role in universal American stylishness in the 1930’s-1950’s, but I find that quite a stretch. She didn’t include readership statistics of their books or participation in their courses. And this was such a small period of American history. Also, most of it wasn’t really a historical treatise but rather focused more on the “Dress Doctors” programs and advice. She doesn’t address the past style of American women for context, nor does she give a reason for the overall lessening of formality (which also applies to Europe, but we declined into outright slobbishness and trends, at least per the average person or fashion site). Also, America is so widely different, even now, you can’t honestly lump everyone together. The rural states had less need and less access to fashion as more urban states with wildly different lifestyles and incomes. She mentions very briefly the divide of the deep South farm girls and the New York city girls, but not very comprehensively. And she focuses so much on urban working women and university women (the later an especially tiny minority) without acknowledging wide differences to or their relative significance to the broader picture.

    Light Fiction

    Fer-de-Lance by Rex Stout. I’m not crazy about these, so many ethical issues.

    Some Buried Caesar by Rex Stout. I decided to try one more, but no.

    The Corinthian by Georgette Heyer. I’d read two Heyer’s before, but while I enjoyed parts, they seemed to drag (also, both were apparently her Georgian novels, this one is Regency, more on that below). I started Regency Buck but couldn’t get into it, and I meant to try again later (I still do, but now our library doesn’t have it anymore). However, this one starts fast and is almost constantly hilarious. My love was dampened by the death and the poor taste response to it though. I gave this four stars.

    The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer. This also starts fast and is hilarious. It also seems deeper and better writing-wise than the above. I gave this four stars. This one is also Regency.

    The Convenient Marriage by Georgette Heyer. Hmm, I wanted to like this (there are some hilarious episodes), but Rule’s adultery. Pointless too, he didn’t care for the woman, he had no reason to be with her, and it’s especially awful that he is trying to woo his wife at. the. same. time. So many layers of NO. Also, as other reviewers pointed out, the heroine is blah. Which is too bad because she starts off so strong. The is Georgian, I could hardly bear the description of the ludicrous Georgian finery and silliness, and I know the period was decadent and immoral (the Regency and the Victorian periods were a reaction to it). One star for the adultery.

    These Old Shades by Georgette Heyer. This is puke. Ugh. The age difference bothered me more here. Heightened by the constant epithet of “mon infant” and her servile, worshipful, constant “Monseigneur”-ing plus her overall worshipful attitude towards His Abominableness. More of the same Georgian decadence and shallowness. If I could give this less than one star and have it mean something, I would. Except heightened especially with being in France. I decided to take a Heyer break for a few weeks after this one.

    Heartless by Anne Elisabeth Stengl. Interesting and fairly unique (to me) fantasy. I disliked the silly, shallow heroine though.

    Gone Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright. Cute middle-grade story. Feels like The Boxcar Children.

    Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn. The residents of an island slowly lose their legal ability to speak. This is funny, although I feel like I probably missed a lot of the jokes.

    The White Stag by Kate Seredy. Um, no, I don’t want a stupid, contrived (felt very copy paste as did the illustrations which were an odd mix of old West, Greco-Roman, and who knows what else), fantasy story about an extremely violent historical person.

    The Awakening of Miss Prim by Natalia Sanmartín Fenollera. Interesting conception in parts, annoyingly stock Darcy/Knightly/Rochester trope. Silly heroine who doesn’t have any believable or developed change, much less awakening. Unexpectedly Christian.

  • Reading

    Cordy’s Lovely Blog Party Tag

    I thought I wouldn’t have enough mental space to be able to participate in Cordy’s Lovely Blog Party, but I’d forgotten about the tag, and this year she made it so much more interesting, I can’t wait to see everyone’s answers!

    Isn’t it romantic to be serenaded?
    Depends on the situation, I can imagine some I’d love (whispering or softly singing a song that I like in a quiet moment), but quiet frankly, most of the times I’ve seen it or that people think it should be done . . . I’d either die of embarrassment or laugh in his face.

    Isn’t it romantic to have pet names for each other?
    Ugh, ugh, ugh. NO!

    Edit: I’m assuming pet names such as “Benny-Boo-Boo” or whatever from How to Lose a Man in 10 Days (though this isn’t used seriously and so is absolutely hysterical) or “Molly-wobbles” from HP. NOT terms of endearments such as “my love” and “honey” and “my darling.” Those I do find romantic, unless of course they include, “mon infant” and “Monseigneur” used in such a way, UGH.

    Isn’t it romantic if he wants you to look him in the eye?
    Probably, and he will probably have to tell me. What is this referencing? “Look back at me?”

    Isn’t it romantic to be carried across the threshold?
    I guess it could be, it’s so overused though.

    Isn’t it romantic to receive flowers and chocolates?
    I love flowers and chocolate and will always take them, but I think the cliche takes away the romance, plus my mom gets us candy at every holiday, so its not only for romance.

    Isn’t it romantic to get caught in the rain?
    Maybe more funny or adventurous. But the funny and adventurous IS more my kinda romance.

    Isn’t it romantic to dance?
    It can be. I think this plus singing softly is the most traditionally romantic thing on the list for me.

    Isn’t it romantic if he asks for your parent’s permission to marry you?
    No, its more just the polite/correct thing to do.

    Isn’t it romantic to be rescued?
    Or its just chivalrous of him?

    Isn’t it romantic to stargaze?
    Maybe, maybe just more fun.

  • Reading

    Reading Goals for 2019

    I looked at my laughably ambition 2018 goals, and I decided to modify them a bit.

    I would like to read 100 new to me books this year. I decided to set that as a reasonable number and add more on as I re-read any or set a better pace or read anything too easy to count. After comparing last year’s reads with this year, I decided I needed to step up my goal for nonfiction and break it down into chunks. I think I want to average about 4 nonfiction books a month for about 48 total. I still need to work setting a note-taking habit.

    • Continue on my U.S. history study. I read all of one, I believe towards that this year and that one was in the early part of the year.
    • The Modern Mrs. Darcy Challenge (since it’s smaller this year)
      • A book you’ve been meaning to read
      • A book about a topic that fascinates you
      • A book in the backlist of a favorite author
      • A book recommended by someone with great taste
      • Three books by the same author
      • A book you chose for the cover
      • A book by an author who is new to you
      • A book in translation
      • A book outside your (genre) comfort zone
      • A book published before you were born
    • Read my borrowed books (in flux, but I think around 5 now) and unread owned physical books (mostly devotional types books, several of them gifts, I think around 30). I’d also like to read several of my ebooks.
    • Classics Club: I’m working on War and Peace currently on Serial reader, so that should be finished this year. I’d like to read all the Shakespeare’s plays that I have listed, 10, I think. I’d like to finish the Ernest Hemingway novels, and try one C.S. Lewis, and maybe at least start Kristin Lavransdatter.
    • I would like to read 2 poetry collections, 2 essay collections, 4 non Shakespearean plays, 4 autobiographies/memoirs/biographies, and 10 scholarly journal articles. I might look over the Pulitzer Prizes for some works.
    • At least one book in each of these categories:
      • World history
      • Personal development
      • Critical thinking
      • Logic
      • Interpersonal communication
      • Art
      • Music
      • Travel
      • Geopolitics
      • Religion/theology
      • Personal finance
      • Science (non-medical)
    • At least 4 fiction and 4 nonfiction from outside the U.S. and Europe
    • My re-reading possibilities
      • Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries
      • Maybe Anne of Green Gables series
      • Much Ado About Nothing
      • To Have and To Hold
      • The Tale of Two Cities
      • Book of Walter Scott’s Poetry
      • Ivanhoe
      • Aunt Jane’s Hero
      • Evelina
      • The Book Thief
      • The Harvester

  • Reading

    My Year in Books: Reading Year in Review

    Here is My Year in Books on Goodreads (I’m not sure its visible for everyone); not sure if the page number is accurate, I did read 140 which it shows at the bottom but not at the top.

    Goodreads numbers (factoring in the slim book that I didn’t list on Goodreads because it had to do with my geographic area, and supplementing the information with stats from My Books > Stats page).

    • 141 books (about 40 more than last year)
    • 39,576+ pages (almost 10,000 pages more than my previous record in 2014; also, see note above on re-reads)
    • Longest book: 908 pages (Brothers Karamazov)
    • Shortest book: 24 pages (the golden book Kitty’s New Doll, a childhood favorite, a Christmas theme this year, that my sister received for Christmas)
    • Average rating: 3.2 (I checked previous years, around 3 usually is my average)
    • Most popular: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
    • Least popular: Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impacts on Human History by J.N. Hays
    • Approximately 25% was on my fantasy shelf
    • Around at least 12-15% was Agatha Christie
    • Most of my 5 star reads were re-reads
    • I had 6 one star reads

    Now, I started also tracking books in Excel. Later I discover that you can export your Goodreads information in an excel sheet, but when I tried for this year the most significant column (date read) didn’t properly transfer for me (less than 1/3 of books read in 2018 showed a date in Excel), so that was rather useless. I asked about this, so we’ll see if it’s corrected.

    Anyway from my 6 main categories (Re-reads, Literary Fiction, Light Fiction, Illustrated Books, Serious Nonfiction, and Popi for this year:

    • Re-reads: 35 (not including Illustrated);  13 Literary Fiction and 22 Light Fiction (last year I re-read around 12)
    • Literary Fiction: 14 (27 including re-reads)
    • Light Fiction: 58 (70 including re-reads)
    • Illustrated Books: 11 (at least 3 and up to 5 were re-reads from childhood)
    • Serious Nonfiction: 10
    • Popular Nonfiction: 13
    • Total nonfiction: 23 (last year I read at least 30)