Movies I’ve Watched: November 2018

I’m going to leave off Hallmark so I can do a larger Christmas post of them

Vintage

The Philadelpia Story. My sister-in-law mentioned how funny this was, so I was rather disappointed. I didn’t find it all that funny. There were a few funny bits, but most of it was boring, and some parts made be angry (e.g. her absolutely horrid father who blames her for his immorality).

Breakfast at Tiffany’s. This was interesting and funny in parts a bit tedious in others. Paul is basically the Ken doll in human form. Okay, not that bad, I found him attractive. But yes, Ken. I think the movies should’ve ended before it did (a bit after her brother dies if not before); Holly ends up looking rather rotten at the end. Skipped Mickey Rooney’s racist  scenes.

Some Like it Hot. Funny, and oh, my word, uncomfortable. A couple of not-very-brave and possibly not very bright musicians (well, Joe’s not, Joe was quite clever when he wanted, the lies that boy told to get Sugar to chase him and to kiss him more . . . Jerry on the other hand, Jerry was demented) witness a mass gang machine gun murder (please, not this is NOT what I expected, I thought like one person was shot with like a pistol or something, so just FYI, and this happens twice!!). So these guys (and to heighten the ludicrousness of it, the filmmakers picked the most manly built guys ever, broad shoulders, muscular limbs) dress up like women to escape. And of course they both are interested in the same girl (Marilyn Monroe who is, another warning, dressed or rather undressed rather worse than a tramp . . . if you think modern movies are bad . . . ). . . and are rather creeps. I thought it funny, but not hysterical, not a favorite.

Animated

The Lego Batman Movie. Fairly funny (in a super goofy way) at first, then tedious and sanctimonious for the rest.

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Gratitude

I’m rather negative (cue laughter of my siblings at this gross understatement), and I tend to focus on negative (my reading breakdown of oh, half a decade; seeming dearth of good fiction I can love, etc.), so I’m going to try to point of 10 things I for which I ought to be grateful (and possible slip in a sociological study or two).

  1. I can read. Even though the statistics look excellent for the modern and the U.S. (Historical Rates for England & Global Literacy Rates), sometimes, they don’t really tell the whole story. I recently read a news article that my state reports a high level for high school graduation, but the system is graduating people who aren’t ready, who can’t read, etc. I’ve heard mention of illiterate kids at my siblings’ high school. I took a long time to learn to read, but I’m smart, and I read a ton now, reading late doesn’t mean a person is stupid, but it sure probably means someone or a lot of someones aren’t caring. I think it is cruel how kids are forced into cookie-cutter rates and shamed if they don’t fit. The main goals should be acquiring and using the ability, not meeting some superficial deadline.
  2. I do read. In 2013, almost one quarter of Americans didn’t read at all, and the overall average read per person was 12 (with a median of 5).
  3. I was raised to read. I grew up in a household where reading was both required and encouraged. My parents read aloud to us from childhood onward. We got those book and book on tape sets from the library (does anyone else remember those; there were in plastic bags with a hook and all hanged on a rod in the children’s section of the library?) this was a favorite activity, to pick our choices. We had shelves of books, we visited our library system, we visited our church library, we were given books as gifts. Much of my mom’s choice of homeschool curriculum focused on the “whole books” style of homeschooling. I think fostering a reading environment is a main part of what transforms “can” into “does.
  4. I have a family who reads. We received the fostering reading environment from readers (my parents) and we, siblings and in-laws are readers. My mom’s parents read as well, my grandfather especially, deeply with tons of history and biography. And potentially nieces and nephews, my baby niece already has a shelf full of books. We pass book ideas and thoughts back and forth; we speak the same or similar book language.
  5. I love the library. Besides knowing how to read and living in a reading environment accessing a library is a pretty significant help to bolster reading, yet in 2016, less than half Americans visited the library and almost 1/5 had never visited at all. Other than living in the boonies without a car, I can’t think of a reason why you couldn’t go. You pay taxes for this, why not use it (and it doesn’t only offer books!)?! Like I mentioned above, visiting libraries was a huge part of my childhood, and this shaped my love for them today.
  6. Growing up around readers. I was surrounded by readers for much of my life. Both churches we attended had libraries, I’m not sure that is the norm anymore. And almost a decade back, some of the young people formed a book club (now defunct) which helped propel me back into reading. The hostess’s made themed food and games, we picked solid books, we were introduced to Goodreads, and we had fun and interesting nerdy conversations.
  7. Beautiful books. I’m thankful for those who understand the importance of making the physical book beautiful from the illustrators of the gorgeous children’s books of my childhood, to the designers of Barnes and Noble and Penguin Clothbound classics. Two forms of art at once!
  8. Book ownership. Hardly anyone through time and place has had the physical and monetary access to books, yet now, here, we can easily build our own personal libraries.
  9. Goodreads. Enough said.
  10. Online reader-bloggers. I’m mainly indebted to the homeschool community, but I have appreciated some of the broader environment (such as TTT). I love having constant ability to continually build my TBR list; to discuss books online; to read reviews; and to participate in fun challenges, events, etc.

What I’ve Read: October 2018

Light Fiction

The Minstrel and the Dragon Pup. Children’s illustrated book by Rosemary Sutcliff. Cute story, but I thought the illustrations lacking.

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making. Cute but definitely trying to hard to be whimsical.

Simon. A Rosemary Sutcliff novel set in Civil War England. I enjoyed it, but I definitely prefer her more ancient settings (and those tend to be better written). This made me curious about the division of England, how and why? As far as I know my family was from the very far north. Puritanism was strongest in the lower east. But how much did actual Puritanism play as opposed to just plain anti-Catholic sentiment (and wasn’t the North more Catholic for a time or was that just more ancient? It wasn’t Catholics who emigrated in the particular wave from which I hail) or just plain anti-Charles I sentiment?

Literary Fiction

Frankenstein. I posted my review previously.

Taliesin. Quite unique in conception I think, I of course, LOVED the Roman-Celtic Britain setting.

An Episode of Sparrows. I got confused and posted about this for September, but I read it in October.

Nonfiction

A book on a county in my state.

 

 

Movies I’ve Watched: October 2018

I’ve sure been hitting my vintage stride. Hallmark has bored me (which is good considering my embarrassing spree over the last years), and I’ve really been needing comfort movies and classic comedies have been hitting the spot, or rather classic movies period, I just prefer the comedies, so I’m going to try to load up on more.

Classics

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town. Both sad and boring, but oh, my, young Gary Cooper is stunning. Also, he looks like Jason Isaacs, so so much.

Monkey Business. Absolutely hysterical. Cary Grant is a comedy genius (definitely like him better now that I’ve seen and understood him in his best role type instead of comparing him to the dreamy  Gregory Peck or handsome sweetheart Jimmy Stuart or the appealing Peter O’Toole who are my romantic favorites). I definitely want to own this one.

How to Marry a Millionaire. Not as nearly as hilarious, but still fun.

To Have and Have Not. A sort of different version of Casablanca. I liked it slightly better, but rather boring still. Bacall and Bogart together, yes, definitely iconic.

The Big Sleep. This and Dark Passage were my favorites of the Bogart/Bacall pairing. I think that this was the better movie, but I actually think I liked the other better or at the least romance was better in Dark Passage. Bogart is better in this murder mystery stories. He’ll never be a crush or a favorite, but I understand better his iconic status

Key Largo. Boring and too many horrible death of innocents.

Dark Passage. See notes above.

Hallmark

Pearl in Paradise. Eh.

Falling for You. Cute.

Under the Autumn Moon. Eh.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Items I Want to Own

I’m linking up here with The Artsy Read Girl for Top Ten Tuesday.

  1. These book plates (plus several of the other designs)
  2. These book ends (or something similarly fanciful and elegant)
  3. Book sleeves similar to this for when I lend out books
  4. A page anchor or something similar
  5. Miniature classic favorite book necklace or classic book locket
  6. Something like this in silver for Captain Wentworth’s letter
  7. Nonspecific book locket
  8. Some bookish art
  9. A map or two or three of Narnia
  10. Some bookmarks featuring favorite books

A Literary Christmas 2018

I’m linking up here for A Literary Christmas again.

I actually planned and researched better this time (I have a list for holiday books to choose from now), and below is my Christmas reading list; I’ve  ordered these already (because previous years I didn’t think, that you know, other people might have requested books near Christmas), and I should be able to put off reading them until December (or at least until after Thanksgiving) to read.

I’ve used up my interlibrary loans for this month, but I think I might try to order some Christmas ones in December, we shall see.

Most Christmas books I seemed to see are either kids books (I’ve included a few from my childhood), Hallmark style (I’ll stick to the movies), moralizing (no thanks), or Christmas histories. So most of my choices are kids books and histories of Christmas traditions, carols, etc.

I’ve also included the Christmas baking books from the library I want to peruse along with the one I own for some Christmas goodies.

Juvenile Fictions
The Holly and the Ivy Rumer Godden
The Latke Who Couldn’t Stop Screaming: A Christmas Story Lemony Snicket
Silver Packages: An Appalachian Christmas Story Cynthia Rylant
The Christmas Day Kitten James Herriot
The Lump of Coal Lemony Snicket
The Best Christmas Pageant Ever Barbara Robinson

Grown-Up Fiction
Christmas At Fairacre Miss Read

Christmas History
Christmas In Williamsurg: 300 Years of Family Traditions K. M. Kostyal
Stories Behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas Ace Collins (I didn’t get to finish this previously)
Pagan Christmas: The Plants, Spirits, And Rituals at The Origins of Yuletide Christian Rätsch

Christmas Baking
Scandikitchen Christmas: Recipes and Traditions from Scandinavia Brontë Aurell
Classic German Baking: The Very Best Recipes for Traditional Favorites, from Pfeffernüsse to Streuselkuchen Luisa Weiss
Festive Baking: Holiday Classics in the Swiss, German, and Austrian Traditions Sarah Kelly Iaia

Review of Frankenstein

I read Frankenstein this month for The Classics Club October Dare. I’m a procrastinator, so I’m really lucky that I have a review done at all; I’m actually proud of myself since I did think ahead, takes notes, and make an outline. I just didn’t leave myself enough time for a couple drafts. And I have more words on this book/the background than the close to 1,000 below.

I’d never really wanted to read Frankenstein; I am not drawn to horror which is what I thought this book was. I procrastinated to start it, and then quickly realized that the book is incredibly dull, predictable rather than suspenseful and frightening. Then I procrastinated because of the tedious verbosity and dull, slow (because of said verbosity) plot. This book requires far too great a suspension of disbelief and not for creativity but for plot holes and devices. I knew some of the circumstances of the writing, written by a teenager during a sort of dare (although undergoing revisions, possibly with her eventually husband’s help). But because it was a classic I was expecting a solid story and prose vs obviously written in Romantic vein by uncontrolled, undisciplined teenager! I think it is famous for the barest plot concept that more recent portrayals have developed and that readers then insert into the story.

This book features absolutely atrocious prose. I was gagging over the stock Romantic language and expression; the flowery verbosity and excessive, sanctimonious and fawning emotionalism and sentimentality. The author is tedious and repetitiveness with details that take away from the story rather than add to it. These fountains of extraneous detail fill in most of the story which would have little substance else because concepts pertinent to the plot are vague and general. And I didn’t find a hint of irony in all this language either.

In amidst all this fluff, some scatter trails of a plot float. With much unrelated verbosity we are get the story from various narrators in a general and literal way (and Frankenstein continually drops spoilers). Everything has told us by the author via her narrators rather than displayed via art; she gives no detail (regarding the actual plot), not from mystery, but from ignorance and lack of creativity. In addition to having a spare plot delivered literally, the plot has so many devices, holes, and implausible points. Shelley exhibits total unawareness of any other class than her own (and any other point of view than her coterie) and this leads to so many of the issues.

Let’s start with Victor Frankenstein, who by the by is no doctor but a pedantic, spoiled, sheltered, young fool. Because of these things, I don’t see how he had: 1) the ability to pursue this creation; he very obviously isn’t the brightest, 2) the interest/passion to pursue such a thing (so little reason had he that I assumed his friend would die and he would revive him, nope, he is just playing around, and he didn’t seem to have passion for anything except whining and protestations, 3) the stomach for such a task; he was such a hypochondriac and always talking about his delicate sensibilities, and 4) the will for such a task; he is indecisive, passive, and lazy elsewhere in the story, dragging his feet at every turn.

Now onto his implausibly created monster. He isn’t described and since the author doesn’t forget any other descriptions (however poor they are and however little they apply to the story), this doesn’t come across as mysterious but rather a lack of creativity. Everything about Frankenstein’s creation is implausible; he has a fully developed mind with the elasticity of a child’s brain with the thought processes of adults. His mind is full of Romantic sensibilities which he quickly taps into thanks to the improbably (and highly Romantic) circumstances of finding himself by educated people who coincidentally aid his learning. All of this is too convenient. He could have had the soul of a demon or another dead person or the mind of the person whose brain Frankenstein gave him. He could have truly come from nothing, truly a blank slate in which case he would have had the mind of an infant or an animal.

In the same vein, a double-minded author doesn’t equal a truly conflicted villain; that requires insight and talent. He comes across as a psychopath; only when he gets what he wants does he act anything like appropriately, his manipulations and revenge, his complaints and reviling, his vicious triple murders (two of which were in cold-blood, the other a child murder) of innocent people to wreak personal revenge all point to psychopathy. His rage isn’t the bewildered, blind lashing out of the abused and abandoned by humanity (that is also implausible, no one gives him any aid at all?), it is very specific, clever revenge. He goes from zero to one hundred in this quite fast. Of course, there are inconsistencies here, sometimes he does rage against humanity (from his tiny experience).

Overall the moral issues are grossly and falsely simplistic expressions of false choice moral “dilemmas”—more from inconsistent plot and lazy thinking, ignorant/irresponsible idle upper-class perspectives than from any understanding of the complexities of human nature and circumstances. All sorts of misunderstandings of duty and virtue. Virtue doesn’t turn to evil; doing good in good times doesn’t make one virtuous; the monster wasn’t ever virtuous, nor did he try. As to the idea that Frankenstein is the villain, I don’t think the story has the depth and irony; I don’t see any irony at all in Victor Frankenstein’s portrayal; I don’t think Romantics understood or appreciated in since they enacted in their own lives as well as in their stories such drama that is ludicrously ripe for satire). I think we can get deep discussion out of the plot and morals (or lack thereof) in the book, but that fact doesn’t make the novel itself deep.

After reading, I immediately had to look and see what other reviewers thought on Goodreads. This review expresses my opinions (and I’m sure others) in a hysterical way.

Left-Handed Calligraphy and Hand-Lettering Links

Left-Handed Writing The man in this video on foundation pens explains the three main ways of that lefties write (I think I’m mainly an underwriter) starting at about 6 minutes into the video. Calligraphy  Calligraphy pens frequently have a flat line tip and in order to make strokes, the pen must be held at a specific angle. Here is an explanation about the issue of calligraphy for lefties (the man is right-handed, but he explains and shows the difference). The strokes of calligraphy are dependent on an angle of the pen that is just extremely hard for us to achieve. And while some people manage to use the right-hander pens, I was personally thrilled to learn of specific pens for left-handers. Basically, these specially pens are cut at an angle so that I can write as I normally would, I could follow all the stroke instructions as written for all the different calligraphy lettering styles. I received the deluxe Manuscript left-handed calligraphy pen set from the John Neal Books left-handed section for Christmas two years ago. When I can get the ink to flow, I LOVE it, but I think I need to learn to clean and store my pens better in order to get the ink to run, maybe I need to clean with alcohol. I’d love to be able to try some of the left-handed dip pens listed as well. This man demonstrates his way of using right-handed pens. I believe he is doing the strokes opposite, up instead of down, etc. so that he can get the proper width with hand and wrist contortions. I personally would rather not have to unlearn and relearn basic writing direction, but this is an interesting adaptation. This girl demonstrates calligraphy with pens that seem to be point rather than straight across. I’m not sure how she gets this to work for her; I’d like to try it, but I’m not sure I could do this. Hand-Lettering Links While my personal style leans more toward the formal calligraphy, I do find hand-lettering pretty. I bought my sister brush pens and loved some things she’s done. She mentioned there being a learning curve, so I looked up videos, and then realized there is probably going to be WAY more of a learning curve for a left-hander although I’d be hard-pressed to explain exactly why since these tips are the same as any other pen, I guess the stroke width also depends on angle? I got my own brush pens and have recently tried them, but I’m not sure they are meant for lettering, rather for drawing and painting. I’m wanting Tombow pens and hoping those will be better. Tips for getting started hand-lettering as a lefty. A playlist for beginning lettering as a lefty. Also, in my searching, I gathered that Arabic calligraphy is done from right to left and may also require oblique pens (the cut of the pens for lefties) for right-handers.

Confused Left-Hander

I was looking on YouTube for left-handed calligraphy videos, when I came across one of those “things that are hard for lefties.” All the comments and sharers are “OMG, yesssss!” Whereas my reactions are more, “I’ve been left-handed all my life, I had no other option, did you just suddenly become left-handed?!!!” I mean, its not like we’ve ever been able to do these another way.

Of course, there are things that when I discover they are harder for lefties, its like a light bulb goes on, calligraphy for instance, once I found leftie oblique cut pens and tried them, I felt all was explained. I pick up most crafts I’m interested fairly quickly, my handwriting can be lovely when I’m not being lazy, so I had been frustrated with this craft and not at all interested in twisting my hand in weird angles. Now I know why I found it so hard and how easy it can be.

I’m just saying its so much a non-issue, that I forget to account for when it will be. We have a straight handle rotary cutter which I can use, so I didn’t even stop and think when I bought a rotary cutter and brought it home. When I tried to use it, I realized with a shaped handle, I’d have to do some odd maneuvering to get it to work. Oops.

Most things, are merely less convenient, but I then I can’t really tell because I’ve always been doing them that way.

But there are some things, I just don’t understand. Writing goes in one direction, it can’t be perfectly mirrored. Some tools have specific places for specifics hands. But cutting can be mirrored with either handed scissors. The first time I understood people meant more than specific handed scissors, I was cutting fabric and the lady teaching me a sewing technique watched me cut and remarked that she was surprised that I could use scissors as her left-handed husband couldn’t. I was so confused as to why, I kept saying, “these aren’t right-handed specific.”

I don’t get that one. All the examples are of scissors that aren’t shaped to the palm; they hardly make those anymore. Obviously we left-handers can’t use those, we can’t put our hands in them. But regular scissors. Are. not. hand. specific. Cutting is mirrored. All the process can be mirrored.

That is why I wonder if there is something more at issue with some left-handed people, they aren’t merely mirror-handed. I think I’m just mirror-handed, only things that are right-handed or directionally specific are different for me. I knit right-handed quite easily. I don’t find the tasks of either hand harder or easier, I learned knitting as fast as any other person. Well, after I realized that you don’t knit back and forth; I had been knitting perfectly symmetrically, blending right and left style, but then so did my right-handed sister (although that may have been my fault), I just got confused, but once that was straightened out I was fine. Crochet on the other hand is much more like writing, and I always try it the left-handed way. I’m not a crocheter although I’d like to be better to make flowers and trim (I don’t care for the look of much else).

Now for commentary on this video. Okay, I know its dramatic and sarcastic. But most of the articles mention similar things (okay, okay, so they are probably all click-bait, but can we have serious discussion?). The scissor thing got me off and running.

I’d never thought about the mug thing; I’m not a big hot drinks user plus many mugs and cups have designs that got all around. I’m thinking I just turn the mug when I set it down and want to see the design.

I use a can opener like a right-hander because there isn’t any other way. That isn’t an angle thing for me, it’s a hand strength issue. I can make the first cut well with my strong hand gripping the bars, but the turning is with my weaker hand. We got a new can opener recently, that new blade makes turning the handle feel like a breeze.

I use a mouse with my right hand, I don’t remember that being hard either. Guys, I swear I’m not ambidextrous. That is REALLY rare.

The pen thing. I write underneath, so I don’t think I smear like that (I do when drawing, but wouldn’t right-handers as well, drawing is mirrored?). I do angle my paper; if I don’t my writing is angled.

Um, guys, notebooks and binders flip. When you write on the front the spiral is under the left-hand, when you flip the page and write on the other side, the spiral is under the right-hand.

Ice cream scoops, ha, this one of those, I don’t even think to consider; I’d just favorited some, I better see if there are left-handed specific.

The credit card thing (I wonder if that’s why I sometimes had to swipe so many times?!!! but not all were on the side, some are on the top), well we are going to the chip, for which we can use the left hand because it doesn’t matter.

I just felt like a long rambling post. I will make another post with links to videos I’ve found on left-handed calligraphy and hand-lettering.

Movies I’ve Watched: September 2018

Hallmark

Love in Design. Not one of the better Hallmarks.

Modern

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before. I like some of it better than the book. Peter, for example, he seemed like a nice kid. In the book he seemed like a two-faced player who’d never really change). Laura Jean came across sweeter in the book; she seemed more selfish and mean in the movie. Of course, I’m not crazy about somewhat realistic high-school relationships. Super uncomfortable about some of the stuff that goes on there. And overall, the message/plot/movie is silly.

10 Things I Hate About You. Hilarious and yet so, so sweet in parts.

She’s the Man. We were screaming with laughter, and I was cringing and hiding my eyes at the unbelievable awkwardness. And young Channing Tatum playing soccer. Oh. my. stars.

You Again. This was so funny in parts. But I didn’t like the sappy ending (maybe sour grapes because I don’t like the people who seem to get everything their way, but seriously, it wasn’t satisfactory plot-wise).

Classics

Gaslight. Too scary and yet too boring for me.

Designing Woman. This was quite funny. I hadn’t seen Lauren Bacall before, and she looks way different than any pictures I’d seen. She and Gregory Peck don’t match at all in looks. He is fine featured, she is huge featured, and her deep voice takes away from him. Also, I think I prefer him, in shall we say, more gentlemanly roles. I’d still watch again though.

What I Read: September 2018

I feel like I have a habit of slacking off and then reading a ton  . . . and then not keeping a good pace. I read 15 books this September. As of this writing, I’m 25 books behind my goal.

Rereads (3)

Magic for MarigoldPat of Silverbush, and Mistress Pat by L.M. Montgomery. Nothing like an L.M. Montgomery book for a soothing and beautiful read.

Light Fiction (6)

Murder is Easy, Towards Zero, Destination UnknownThe Secret of ChimneysThe Seven Dials Mystery, and Sparkling Cyanide. I needed some more easy reads, but of course I needed to save some of Agatha Christie, and I usually get a little freaked out after awhile.

Literary Fiction (1)

An Episode of Sparrows by Rumer Godden. The beginning was slow, the middle beautiful, the ending rather slapdash and ludicrous and also made the beginning look silly too. I’ll still read more of Godden though for that middle goodness.

Serious Nonfiction (2)

Death by Living: Life is Meant to Be Spent by N.D. Wilson. I love his voice and his prose and his insight even if I’m estranged from his message.

The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt. I think this straddles the below category because while the subject is serious, I think the treatment is deceptive it is “depth.” And I’ll leave it at that.

Popular Nonfiction (3)

Book Girl: A Journey Through the Treasures and Transforming Power of a Reading Life by Sarah Clarkson. I think this straddles the serious category because it is far deeper than the similar book below. So much in here struck a cord with me. I’ve experienced Sarah’s deep writing on her blog and her sister’s writing on her blog. I was sure enough on the depth of this book that I preordered it (I mean she promised extra reading lists and such for preorders too); I’m so glad I treated myself. This is something I will be going back to again and again. I had hardly started in before I was bursting into my sisters room raving about Sarah’s discussion of discernment (an opportune irony moment, my sister had a peculiar smile/smirk and when questioned, revealed the cover of the book she was reading, one of the Twilight books, ha, I’ve read them too, at I think the same age). I’ve since lent the book to another sister. This is just the deep discussion of humanities and taste of which I’ve felt a lack.

I’ve already picked up one of her recommendations (one I’d heard of but wasn’t at our library, so I hadn’t pursued strongly). I’d read many recommendations, but she had plenty more, including some I’d heard of and thought I should try to pursue more seriously (most of the times I add books to my massive library TBR list and then randomly order them and possibly try them).  I since noticed that Joy, her sister, has started a podcast, so I’ve listened to a few of those, including one with her brother about heroes (go listen!). That family clearly knows how to discuss deeply. I know my mom had their mother’s books that I skimmed growing up, but I since I skimmed those ages back probably sort of pushed them all (unjustly) too close to those other Christian Mom type books (which can be really fluffy), but now I want to know pursue more of her work with her children.

Captivate: The Science of Succeeding with People by Vanessa Van Edwards. This was interesting book on interpersonal skills, more in my language than Crucial Conversations. Probably a book I need to own and reread.

I’d Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading Life Popular Nonfiction by Anne Bogel. This is superficial; this is from that group of readers who I just can’t relate to even if I technically agree with some of the words and opinions expressed, there is no real Kindred Spirit. I read it for contrast and to have quick read (cheap, I know) with Book Girl (publishers seem to have a theme going, I have my sights on another book in this category, probably more in the Book Girl league).

 

Top Ten Tuesday: The Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

I’m linking up here with The Artsy Read Girl for Top Ten Tuesday.

To the best of my knowledge this are the longest books I’ve read (as of 9/2/18). I was relying on Goodreads, and editions vary because of size of pages, size of type, any extras (introductions), and anything else that may or may not affect actual page count or numbered page count.

  1. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky: 908 pages. I’m glad to save I’ve read this, but if I read again it would be skimming or an abridged version and still not sure it would be worth it.
  2. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo: 1,463 pages. Um, overrated. Not literature-quality writing/prose, and much digging and parsing required to reach the literature/epic-quality plot.
  3. Camilla by Fanny Burney: 992 pages. 18th/19th century fluff reading, lol.
  4. Cecilia by Fanny Burney: 1056 pages. 18th/19th century fluff reading, lol.
  5. Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens: 985 pages. I need to re-read, one of his best.
  6. Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens: 894 pages. Meh.
  7. Bleak House by Charles Dickens: 1,017 pages.I think this is supposed to be one of his best, but I didn’t like the characters much, and I don’t think I care enough for his prose and the plot.
  8. Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer: 972 pages. An excellent history.
  9. Middlemarch by George Eliot: 904 pages. Definitely worth a re-read.
  10. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke: 1006. Bizarre. Ended rather abruptly and confusingly.